Madeline Island Museum honors Anniversary of 1854 Treaty

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LaPointe, Wisconsin (ICC) 9-08

On September 30, 1854 the headmen of the Lake Superior Ojibwe (Chippewa) including heroic Chief Buffalo (Bezhike) gathered at LaPointe Wisconsin to sign an important Treaty with the American Government.  After the tragic attempt to remove all Ojibwe people from Michigan, Wisconsin and parts of Minnesota to lands west of the Mississippi at Sandy Lake, Min., Ojibwe leaders succeeded in their determination to never leave their homelands.

The Ojibwe signed a treaty with the United States Government in 1854, which established permanent sovereign reservations in the Ojibwe (Chippewa) homelands of Wisconsin and Minnesota.  They would never be threatened with removal again to lands far away.  The 1854 Treaty established most of the sovereign Ojibwe reservations that exist in Wisconsin and Minnesota today.
 

In honor of great leaders, such as Chief Buffalo, Oshaga, and the historic Signing of the Treaty of 1854 a special event has been planned on Madeline Island.  The Madeline Island Museum is having a free admission open house with educational and artistic activities on Sunday, September 28, from 10:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.  Refreshments will be served and visitors will meet representatives of the The Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission (GLIFWC) which represents 11 member Ojibwe Bands.

The GLIFWC booth will provide colorful information on the Treaties and Natural Resource programs throughout the region.  Curt Buffalo, Red Cliff Ojibwe, will share stories with visitors about his ancestor, Chief Buffalo and demonstrate making loom beadwork.  The new film, “Mikwendaagoziwag- They Are Remembered” on the Sandy Lake Ojibwe tragedy and triumph will be shown hourly in the Museum theater.  Additional educational, cultural, and artistic displays will be open all day.

Everyone is welcome to attend and learn more about the historic Signing of the 1854 Treaty that occurred on Madeline Island.  Visitors may also choose to visit the Ojibwe Memorial Park and other important sites on the Island.

This special family event is part of the 50th Anniversary celebration of the Madeline Island Museum.  For more information contact the Museum at 715-747-2415 or go to www.madelineislandmuseum.org

 

 

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